Top 25 Most Popular Poems of Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

These are the top twenty-five(25) most popular poems of Emily Elizabeth Dickinson.

From Hope. to A Book.

If you want to know her greatest poems of all time, then this poetry collection is for you.

Keep reading!

Hope.


Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul,
And sings the tune without the words,
And never stops at all,


And sweetest in the gale is heard;
And sore must be the storm
That could abash the little bird
That kept so many warm.


I ‘ve heard it in the chillest land,
And on the strangest sea;
Yet, never, in extremity,
It asked a crumb of me.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

In The Garden.


A bird came down the walk:
He did not know I saw;
He bit an angle-worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw.


And then he drank a dew
From a convenient grass,
And then hopped sidewise to the wall
To let a beetle pass.


He glanced with rapid eyes
That hurried all abroad, —
They looked like frightened beads, I thought;
He stirred his velvet head


Like one in danger; cautious,
I offered him a crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers
And rowed him softer home


Than oars divide the ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or butterflies, off banks of noon,
Leap, plashless, as they swim.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“A Little Road Not Made Of Man,”


A little road not made of man,
Enabled of the eye,
Accessible to thill of bee,
Or cart of butterfly.


If town it have, beyond itself,
‘T is that I cannot say;
I only sigh, — no vehicle
Bears me along that way.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“Angels In The Early Morning”


Angels in the early morning
May be seen the dews among,
Stooping, plucking, smiling, flying:
Do the buds to them belong?


Angels when the sun is hottest
May be seen the sands among,
Stooping, plucking, sighing, flying;
Parched the flowers they bear along.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“I Have No Life But This,”


I have no life but this,
To lead it here;
Nor any death, but lest
Dispelled from there;


Nor tie to earths to come,
Nor action new,
Except through this extent,
The realm of you.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

Alpine Glow.


Our lives are Swiss, —
So still, so cool,
Till, some odd afternoon,
The Alps neglect their curtains,
And we look farther on.


Italy stands the other side,
While, like a guard between,
The solemn Alps,
The siren Alps,
Forever intervene!

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“I Had No Time To Hate, Because”


I had no time to hate, because
The grave would hinder me,
And life was not so ample I
Could finish enmity.


Nor had I time to love; but since
Some industry must be,
The little toil of love, I thought,
Was large enough for me.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“If I Should Die,”


If I should die,
And you should live,
And time should gurgle on,
And morn should beam,
And noon should burn,
As it has usual done;
If birds should build as early,
And bees as bustling go, —
One might depart at option
From enterprise below!
‘T is sweet to know that stocks will stand
When we with daisies lie,
That commerce will continue,
And trades as briskly fly.
It makes the parting tranquil
And keeps the soul serene,
That gentlemen so sprightly
Conduct the pleasing scene!

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“If I Can Stop One Heart From Breaking,”


If I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain;
If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help one fainting robin
Unto his nest again,
I shall not live in vain.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“The Heart Asks Pleasure First,”


The heart asks pleasure first,
And then, excuse from pain;
And then, those little anodynes
That deaden suffering;


And then, to go to sleep;
And then, if it should be
The will of its Inquisitor,
The liberty to die.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

I Bring An Unaccustomed Wine


I bring an unaccustomed wine
To lips long parching, next to mine,
And summon them to drink.


Crackling with fever, they essay;
I turn my brimming eyes away,
And come next hour to look.


The hands still hug the tardy glass;
The lips I would have cooled, alas!
Are so superfluous cold,


I would as soon attempt to warm
The bosoms where the frost has lain
Ages beneath the mould.


Some other thirsty there may be
To whom this would have pointed me
Had it remained to speak.


And so I always bear the cup
If, haply, mine may be the drop
Some pilgrim thirst to slake, —


If, haply, any say to me,
“Unto the little, unto me,”
When I at last awake.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

A Rose.


A sepal, petal, and a thorn
Upon a common summer’s morn,
A flash of dew, a bee or two,
A breeze
A caper in the trees, —
And I’m a rose!

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“The Bee Is Not Afraid Of Me,”


The bee is not afraid of me,
I know the butterfly;
The pretty people in the woods
Receive me cordially.


The brooks laugh louder when I come,
The breezes madder play.
Wherefore, mine eyes, thy silver mists?
Wherefore, O summer’s day?

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“I Asked No Other Thing,”


I asked no other thing,
No other was denied.
I offered Being for it;
The mighty merchant smiled.


Brazil? He twirled a button,
Without a glance my way:
“But, madam, is there nothing else
That we can show to-day?”

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

Exclusion.


The soul selects her own society,
Then shuts the door;
On her divine majority
Obtrude no more.


Unmoved, she notes the chariot’s pausing
At her low gate;
Unmoved, an emperor is kneeling
Upon her mat.


I’ve known her from an ample nation
Choose one;
Then close the valves of her attention
Like stone.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

Nature Rarer Uses Yellow


Nature rarer uses yellow
Than another hue;
Saves she all of that for sunsets, —
Prodigal of blue,


Spending scarlet like a woman,
Yellow she affords
Only scantly and selectly,
Like a lover’s words.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

I’m Nobody!


I’m Nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there’s a pair of us — don’t tell!
They ‘d banish us, you know.


How dreary to be somebody!
How public, like a frog
To tell your name the livelong day
To an admiring bog!

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“A Wounded Deer Leaps Highest,”


A wounded deer leaps highest,
I’ve heard the hunter tell;
‘T is but the ecstasy of death,
And then the brake is still.


The smitten rock that gushes,
The trampled steel that springs;
A cheek is always redder
Just where the hectic stings!


Mirth is the mail of anguish,
In which it cautions arm,
Lest anybody spy the blood
And “You’re hurt” exclaim!

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

A Light Exists In Spring


A light exists in spring
Not present on the year
At any other period.
When March is scarcely here


A color stands abroad
On solitary hills
That science cannot overtake,
But human nature feels.


It waits upon the lawn;
It shows the furthest tree
Upon the furthest slope we know;
It almost speaks to me.


Then, as horizons step,
Or noons report away,
Without the formula of sound,
It passes, and we stay:


A quality of loss
Affecting our content,
As trade had suddenly encroached
Upon a sacrament.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“I Know A Place Where Summer Strives”


I know a place where summer strives
With such a practised frost,
She each year leads her daisies back,
Recording briefly, “Lost.”


But when the south wind stirs the pools
And struggles in the lanes,
Her heart misgives her for her vow,
And she pours soft refrains


Into the lap of adamant,
And spices, and the dew,
That stiffens quietly to quartz,
Upon her amber shoe.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

Real.


I like a look of agony,
Because I know it’s true;
Men do not sham convulsion,
Nor simulate a throe.


The eyes glaze once, and that is death.
Impossible to feign
The beads upon the forehead
By homely anguish strung.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

A Day.


I’ll tell you how the sun rose, —
A ribbon at a time.
The steeples swam in amethyst,
The news like squirrels ran.


The hills untied their bonnets,
The bobolinks begun.
Then I said softly to myself,
“That must have been the sun!”


* * *


But how he set, I know not.
There seemed a purple stile
Which little yellow boys and girls
Were climbing all the while


Till when they reached the other side,
A dominie in gray
Put gently up the evening bars,
And led the flock away.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“Have You Got A Brook In Your Little Heart,”


Have you got a brook in your little heart,
Where bashful flowers blow,
And blushing birds go down to drink,
And shadows tremble so?


And nobody knows, so still it flows,
That any brook is there;
And yet your little draught of life
Is daily drunken there.


Then look out for the little brook in March,
When the rivers overflow,
And the snows come hurrying from the hills,
And the bridges often go.


And later, in August it may be,
When the meadows parching lie,
Beware, lest this little brook of life
Some burning noon go dry!

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

“If You Were Coming In The Fall,”


If you were coming in the fall,
I’d brush the summer by
With half a smile and half a spurn,
As housewives do a fly.


If I could see you in a year,
I’d wind the months in balls,
And put them each in separate drawers,
Until their time befalls.


If only centuries delayed,
I’d count them on my hand,
Subtracting till my fingers dropped
Into Van Diemen’s land.


If certain, when this life was out,
That yours and mine should be,
I’d toss it yonder like a rind,
And taste eternity.


But now, all ignorant of the length
Of time’s uncertain wing,
It goads me, like the goblin bee,
That will not state its sting.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

A Book.


There is no frigate like a book
To take us lands away,
Nor any coursers like a page
Of prancing poetry.
This traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of toll;
How frugal is the chariot
That bears a human soul!

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson

These poems are really unique! From all the poetry collections I’ve read, no wonder she has been regarded as one of the most important personages in American Poetry. She’s amazing!

Of course―“If I Can Stop One Heart From Breaking,” is my all-time favorite poem of hers. It’s direct but straight to the heart. I have already memorized it, and it will be my maxim for this year.

What about you? What’s your most favorite poem of Emily Dickinson?

Do you still want to add another of her poem to this list? Let me know in the comment section below! 😉

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